Tag Archives: Michel Houellebecq

As Individuals, Let’s All Be Unhappy Together

In the summer edition of American Affairs, Dutch politician (trigger warning, soft ones) Thierry Baudet condenses the message of French writer Michel Houellebecq’s oeuvre: our contemporary moral and political freedoms have given many choices, but they have not given us … Continue reading

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Sacrificed Generation

At the bar recently (I know–shocking revelation: you read it first at bourbonapocalypse), I read the following passage in Houellebecq’s Whatever. (I bring books to the bar not to look pretentious, for we are now at such an abysmal point in … Continue reading

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Not All Anti-Heroes Wear Capes (but They May Wear Tweed Trousers)

“I refuse to ‘look up.’ Optimism nauseates me. It is perverse. Since man’s fall, his proper position in the universe has been one of misery.” With that kitchen table declaration, one of the most Falstaffian of all modern protagonists–or, as … Continue reading

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